Auditing The Black Watch Museum Archive for research, learning and legacy.

I’m Heather Roberts, a professional archive consultant. This May, I had the privilege and pleasure of getting up close and personal with the archive at The Black Watch Castle and Museum. I was asked to undertake an audit of the archive to help guide the management of the collection and development of the service. Ever … Read moreAuditing The Black Watch Museum Archive for research, learning and legacy.

The history of the T.O.S

To celebrate #NationalHatDay our archivist, Richard McKenzie talks to us shares with us the story of the T.O.S……. In military terms, the ToS (not to be confused with the TOS-1 which is a Russian rocket launcher) or Tam o’ Shanter, which replaced the Glengarry Cap in 1915 has a long, and noble history. Starting with … Read moreThe history of the T.O.S

Reflections on 2016

As 2016 draws to a close we look back at what has been an incredible year for The Black Watch Castle and Museum. We were proud to host the poignant Last of the Tide – Portraits of D –Day Veterans exhibition during the summer of 2016, the only venue out with the Royal Palaces to … Read moreReflections on 2016

The Marriage Portrait of Lieutenant Colonel James Stewart to Williamina Kerr

A favourite painting of the Museum staff is the Marriage Portrait of Lieutenant Colonel James Stewart to Williamina Kerr 1803 by James Giles (b.1801-d.1870), as it is one of the few paintings in the collection which portrays a female. This is an oil painting on canvas, 102 x 75cm. This painting can be viewed by … Read moreThe Marriage Portrait of Lieutenant Colonel James Stewart to Williamina Kerr

The Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knife

  As a Regimental Museum it is difficult, when wandering around the store, to avoid the occasional sharp, pointy thing, which always seem to be either at head, or elbow, level. All of us who work with the objects in storage have a story to tell about a particular item that is always ‘out to … Read moreThe Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knife

Why do we remember with the Poppy?

Poppies were a common sight, especially on the Western Front. They flourished in the soil churned up by the fighting and shelling. The flower provided Canadian doctor John McCrae with inspiration for his poem ‘In Flanders Fields‘, which he wrote whilst serving in Ypres in 1915. It was first published in Punch, having been rejected … Read moreWhy do we remember with the Poppy?

Tom Piper, designer of Poppies Weeping Window talks about the sculpture at The Black Watch Castle and Museum

  On 30 June we opened another installation, the first in Mainland Scotland, of the Weeping Window at The Black Watch Museum in Perth. The site was chosen as having a perfect blend of Historical significance and architectural beauty. The sculpture is sited with the poppies pouring out of a corner turret on the Castle, … Read moreTom Piper, designer of Poppies Weeping Window talks about the sculpture at The Black Watch Castle and Museum

Poppy Partner, Elizabeth Sime talks about her experience.

  Until recently, my only connection with Balhousie Castle, was to occasionally enjoy a cup of tea and a delicious scone in the café. I also have a family link with the Regiment as my husband’s uncle, Private William John Morrison, had served with The Black Watch in Cyprus, 1957-1959. In February this year, my … Read morePoppy Partner, Elizabeth Sime talks about her experience.

The Attack on Hanna, 21st January 1916

On this day one hundred years ago, 75 men of The Black Watch lost their lives. Read on to discover what caused this spike in casualty numbers. As the situation for the besieged British forces at Kut grew more desperate, General Townshend eventually announced that he would have to put the defenders on half rations. … Read moreThe Attack on Hanna, 21st January 1916

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